Ball, Thomas – American Artist & Sculptor

Thomas Ball (American, 1819 to 1911)

Thomas Ball, born in Massachusetts the son of a house and sign painter, worked at Moses Kimball’s Boston Museum and Fine Arts Gallery, where he also cut silhouettes. Beginning in 1837, he progressed to miniature, and then life-sized, portraits. His work was exhibited at the Boston Athenaeum, the American Art Union, and the Apollo Art Association. Beginning about 1851, however, Ball focused on sculpture, his most famous being his equestrian George Washington in the Boston Public Garden, his statue of Daniel Webster in New York’s Central Park, and the Lincoln Emancipation Group in Boston and Washington, D.C. Ball moved to Italy in 1865 and took up residence next door to Hiram Powers. He returned to the United States in 1897 and set up a studio in New York. He then retired to Montclair, New Jersey where he died in 1911.

Information courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions, May 2004.

Although he studied both music and painting, Ball is best know for his naturalistic works of sculpture executed in marble and bronze. Beginning with renderings of musicians, he quickly gained success as a sculptor. His numerous works include a Henry Clay statue displayed New York’s Central Park and George Washington equestrian statue in Boston’s Public Garden.

Ball spent a considerable period of time in Florence. There, he formed close relationships with other expatriate artists and writers including sculptor Hiram Powers.

Information courtesy of Skinner, Inc., September 2006.


Ball, Thomas – American Artist & Sculptor

Thomas Ball (American, 1819 to 1911)

Thomas Ball, born in Massachusetts the son of a house and sign painter, worked at Moses Kimball’s Boston Museum and Fine Arts Gallery, where he also cut silhouettes. Beginning in 1837, he progressed to miniature, and then life-sized, portraits. His work was exhibited at the Boston Athenaeum, the American Art Union, and the Apollo Art Association. Beginning about 1851, however, Ball focused on sculpture, his most famous being his equestrian George Washington in the Boston Public Garden, his statue of Daniel Webster in New York’s Central Park, and the Lincoln Emancipation Group in Boston and Washington, D.C. Ball moved to Italy in 1865 and took up residence next door to Hiram Powers. He returned to the United States in 1897 and set up a studio in New York. He then retired to Montclair, New Jersey where he died in 1911.

Information courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions, May 2004.

Although he studied both music and painting, Ball is best know for his naturalistic works of sculpture executed in marble and bronze. Beginning with renderings of musicians, he quickly gained success as a sculptor. His numerous works include a Henry Clay statue displayed New York’s Central Park and George Washington equestrian statue in Boston’s Public Garden.

Ball spent a considerable period of time in Florence. There, he formed close relationships with other expatriate artists and writers including sculptor Hiram Powers.

Information courtesy of Skinner, Inc., September 2006.


Ball, Thomas – American Artist & Sculptor

Thomas Ball (American, 1819 to 1911)

Thomas Ball, born in Massachusetts the son of a house and sign painter, worked at Moses Kimball’s Boston Museum and Fine Arts Gallery, where he also cut silhouettes. Beginning in 1837, he progressed to miniature, and then life-sized, portraits. His work was exhibited at the Boston Athenaeum, the American Art Union, and the Apollo Art Association. Beginning about 1851, however, Ball focused on sculpture, his most famous being his equestrian George Washington in the Boston Public Garden, his statue of Daniel Webster in New York’s Central Park, and the Lincoln Emancipation Group in Boston and Washington, D.C. Ball moved to Italy in 1865 and took up residence next door to Hiram Powers. He returned to the United States in 1897 and set up a studio in New York. He then retired to Montclair, New Jersey where he died in 1911.

Information courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions, May 2004.

Although he studied both music and painting, Ball is best know for his naturalistic works of sculpture executed in marble and bronze. Beginning with renderings of musicians, he quickly gained success as a sculptor. His numerous works include a Henry Clay statue displayed New York’s Central Park and George Washington equestrian statue in Boston’s Public Garden.

Ball spent a considerable period of time in Florence. There, he formed close relationships with other expatriate artists and writers including sculptor Hiram Powers.

Information courtesy of Skinner, Inc., September 2006.


Ball, Thomas – American Artist & Sculptor

Thomas Ball (American, 1819 to 1911)

Thomas Ball, born in Massachusetts the son of a house and sign painter, worked at Moses Kimball’s Boston Museum and Fine Arts Gallery, where he also cut silhouettes. Beginning in 1837, he progressed to miniature, and then life-sized, portraits. His work was exhibited at the Boston Athenaeum, the American Art Union, and the Apollo Art Association. Beginning about 1851, however, Ball focused on sculpture, his most famous being his equestrian George Washington in the Boston Public Garden, his statue of Daniel Webster in New York’s Central Park, and the Lincoln Emancipation Group in Boston and Washington, D.C. Ball moved to Italy in 1865 and took up residence next door to Hiram Powers. He returned to the United States in 1897 and set up a studio in New York. He then retired to Montclair, New Jersey where he died in 1911.

Information courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions, May 2004.

Although he studied both music and painting, Ball is best know for his naturalistic works of sculpture executed in marble and bronze. Beginning with renderings of musicians, he quickly gained success as a sculptor. His numerous works include a Henry Clay statue displayed New York’s Central Park and George Washington equestrian statue in Boston’s Public Garden.

Ball spent a considerable period of time in Florence. There, he formed close relationships with other expatriate artists and writers including sculptor Hiram Powers.

Information courtesy of Skinner, Inc., September 2006.


Ball, Thomas – American Artist & Sculptor

A Bronze American Bison Sculpture by Tom Hewlett

p4A ItemID F7939859
Bronze Horse Sculpture by Tom Hewlett (American, 20th century), signed on base

p4A ItemID F7939710
Bronze sculpture, Eland, by Tom Hewlett, American, 20th century, signed 1971

p4A ItemID F7939709
Bronze Sculpture, Bighorn Sheep by Tom Hewlett American, 20th century, unsigned

p4A ItemID F7939708

Thomas Ball (American, 1819 to 1911)

Thomas Ball, born in Massachusetts the son of a house and sign painter, worked at Moses Kimball’s Boston Museum and Fine Arts Gallery, where he also cut silhouettes. Beginning in 1837, he progressed to miniature, and then life-sized, portraits. His work was exhibited at the Boston Athenaeum, the American Art Union, and the Apollo Art Association. Beginning about 1851, however, Ball focused on sculpture, his most famous being his equestrian George Washington in the Boston Public Garden, his statue of Daniel Webster in New York’s Central Park, and the Lincoln Emancipation Group in Boston and Washington, D.C. Ball moved to Italy in 1865 and took up residence next door to Hiram Powers. He returned to the United States in 1897 and set up a studio in New York. He then retired to Montclair, New Jersey where he died in 1911.

Information courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions, May 2004.

Although he studied both music and painting, Ball is best know for his naturalistic works of sculpture executed in marble and bronze. Beginning with renderings of musicians, he quickly gained success as a sculptor. His numerous works include a Henry Clay statue displayed New York’s Central Park and George Washington equestrian statue in Boston’s Public Garden.

Ball spent a considerable period of time in Florence. There, he formed close relationships with other expatriate artists and writers including sculptor Hiram Powers.

Information courtesy of Skinner, Inc., September 2006.


Ball, Thomas – American Artist & Sculptor

Thomas Ball (American, 1819 to 1911)

Thomas Ball, born in Massachusetts the son of a house and sign painter, worked at Moses Kimball’s Boston Museum and Fine Arts Gallery, where he also cut silhouettes. Beginning in 1837, he progressed to miniature, and then life-sized, portraits. His work was exhibited at the Boston Athenaeum, the American Art Union, and the Apollo Art Association. Beginning about 1851, however, Ball focused on sculpture, his most famous being his equestrian George Washington in the Boston Public Garden, his statue of Daniel Webster in New York’s Central Park, and the Lincoln Emancipation Group in Boston and Washington, D.C. Ball moved to Italy in 1865 and took up residence next door to Hiram Powers. He returned to the United States in 1897 and set up a studio in New York. He then retired to Montclair, New Jersey where he died in 1911.

info courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions, May 2004.

Although he studied both music and painting, Ball is best know for his naturalistic works of sculpture executed in marble and bronze. Beginning with renderings of musicians, he quickly gained success as a sculptor. His numerous works include a Henry Clay statue displayed New York’s Central Park and George Washington equestrian statue in Boston’s Public Garden.

Ball spent a considerable period of time in Florence. There, he formed close relationships with other expatriate artists and writers including sculptor Hiram Powers.

info courtesy of Skinner, Inc., September 2006.


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