John Bradford Moore and the Crystal Trading Post

John Bradford Moore and the Crystal Trading Post

In 1896, Texas-born John Bradford Moore, the former mayor of Sheridan, Wyoming, purchased the seasonal trading post at Narbona Pass in New Mexico. He erected a permanent log building and established the Crystal Trading Post.

By the turn of the twentieth century, Moore’s post was flourishing, particularly in the sale of Navajo weavings. Like other trading post operators, Moore saw the value in adapting his product [...] Click here to continue reading.


Leigh E. and Christine Robinson Collection Provenance Note-Cowan’s April 2013

Leigh E. and Christine Robinson Collection

Leigh Robinson (1882 to 1960) was born in Cedar Falls, Iowa, the son of a contractor, and graduated in 1904 from the Iowa State Teacher’s College with a Master’s of Didactics. Teaching first in Iowa, and later in Montana and Washington State, he joined the U.S. Customs Service, serving first in Seattle and then from 1907 to 1917 in Blaine, Washington.

As a child, Robinson became intrigued by [...] Click here to continue reading.


Collection of Kent and Karen Vickery Provenance Note-Cowans 4-5-2013

Collection of Kent and Karen Vickery, Colorado

Dr. Kent Vickery (1942 to 2011) grew up with parents who were avid collectors of Native American Southwest arts and crafts. Kent started developing his own collection in the 1950s while on family vacations. Summer excursions to various Pueblos and to the Gallup Ceremonials sparked a true love in Kent and spurred him to earn his PhD from Indiana University in Anthropology/ Archaeology where he specialized in [...] Click here to continue reading.


Will Evans and the Shiprock Trading Post

Will Evans and the Shiprock Trading Post

Will Evans (1877 to 1954), also known as Awoshk’al or “Missing Tooth” to the Navajo, partnered with Joe Wilkins and Ed Dustin in 1898 to build Little Water Trading Post in Sanostee Valley, south of Shiprock, New Mexico. Filled with dry goods and groceries, Evans spent that first winter alone manning the shop, trading with the Navajo, and passing his time by painting. In 1917, Evans purchased [...] Click here to continue reading.


Shona-Hah or Mary J. Smith – Native American Carver

Shona-Hah or Mary J. Smith (Native American, 1912 to 1997)

Shona-Hah or Mary J. Smith was Cherokee by birth and became the matriarch of the Lelooska family. Her artwork, and especially her “Little People,” has left a legacy of both the everyday activities and the ceremonial dress of Native Americans. In June 1983 Southwest Art featured her in an article on pages 65-71.

Information courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions Inc., September 2006.


Celt

Celt

Small celts were used as skinning tools. Larger examples could have been used as small chopping devices, like a small ax. Sizes can vary greatly, and they can be made out of slate or granite. They would correctly be classified as tools, as would a stone ax or hammer.

Reference note by p4A editorial staff, November 2011.


Parker, Quanah

Quanah Parker (1845? to 1911)

Quanah Parker (circa 1845 to 1911) was the son of Peta Nocona, a Comanche chief, and Cynthia Ann Parker, the daughter of a settler who was captured in 1836 when she was nine years old. She grew up happily in the Comanche culture until she was abducted back into white civilization where she lived unhappily and finally died. Quanah fought against the westward pressures caused by the settlers but [...] Click here to continue reading.


Plummets

Plummets

The artifact that we call a plummet, named for the resemblance of its tear-drop shape to the carpenter’s plumb-bob, first appeared in the Late Archaic period, about 1000 B.C. They are found all over the U.S., and the world as well, made from various materials available in the local area either naturally or by trade, including hematite, hardstone, copper, antler and marine shell. They may be well crafted, ornamented and polished or crude [...] Click here to continue reading.


Collection of Ervin F. Cheney

Collection of Ervin F. Cheney (1844 to 1922)

It is often said that men like Ervin F. Cheney invented the old west, but it seems just as likely that the old west invented him. In fact, his life reads like a script for a Hollywood movie, beginning in the carnage of the Civil War and running through all the phases of life for a pioneer in territorial Wyoming, from Indian wars through gold fever, [...] Click here to continue reading.


Hematite Artifacts

Hematite Artifacts

Hematite is the mineral form of iron oxide comprising up to 70 percent iron. It is colored black to gray, brown or red, usually with a rust-red streak. The mineral takes its name from the Greek, “haimatites”, which we translate as bloodlike, thus the name alludes to the vivid red color of the iron powder.

Hematite is harder than pure iron, but much more brittle. Large deposits of hematite are found in [...] Click here to continue reading.


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