Brown, John George – American Artist

John George Brown (American, 1831-1913)

John George Brown was one of the most successful genre painters of the second half of the 19th century. His paintings of country and city children were enthusiastically collected during his lifetime, and by the time he died in 1913, he was a very wealthy man. A methodical and conscientious worker, Brown had a total oeuvre numbering more than a thousand paintings.

Brown was born near Durham, England [...] Click here to continue reading.

Currier & Ives

Currier & Ives

We take the availability of art all around us for granted. That’s part of post-modernism, the fact that there’s no real original now, but just a stream of copies. There are sites all over the Internet offering inexpensive poster copies of great works of art, but until roughly the mid-19th century, artwork in homes was limited, both in quantity and quality. Wealth made it possible to commission portraits and landscapes from [...] Click here to continue reading.

Gouache – Definition

Gouache vs. Watercolor

Gouache (sometimes referred to as body color and pronounced “gwash”) and watercolor paintings are often not clearly distinguished as being different, perhaps because making the distinction just based on a visual examination can be difficult, perhaps because both techniques are often used in the same work, but they are different in fundamental ways. Watercolors have pigment, a binding agent, any additives an artist might use to manipulate durability and texture, and [...] Click here to continue reading.

Howell, Claude Flynn – American Artist

Claude Flynn Howell (North Carolina, 1915-1997)

A native of Wilmington, North Carolina, Claude Howell’s artistic career spanned seven decades and culminated in international recognition of his place not only as an interpreter of the people and landscape of coastal North Carolina, but as an important contributor to 20th century American art. He began his art studies under Elisabeth Chant in Wilmington, NC but with the great Depression he took a job as a [...] Click here to continue reading.

Bill and Florence Griffin Collection, Provenance – Brunk 5-30-09

Collection of Florence P. and William W. Griffin

Bill and Florence Griffin met at an Atlanta Bird Club meeting in 1945. Bill was a published amateur ornithologist; Florence was interested in all of nature – she knew the names of all the plants as well as the birds.

Both were from Georgia, and soon began to see their state changing before their eyes as the New South swept away the Old. They quickly became [...] Click here to continue reading.

Scherenschnitte or Paper Cutting

Just about any culture with paper has a form of paper-cutting decoration, but establishing much of the history is tricky because of the fragile, ephemeral nature of paper. Still, we know that China and Japan were practicing paper-cutting very early, and the usage depends on the culture. In Japan, paper-cutting was used to create decorations for the home, while in Jewish and Eastern European cultures, the cuttings often had a religious theme. The [...] Click here to continue reading.

Zao, Wou-Ki – Chinese/French Artist

Zao Wou-Ki (French/Chinese, 1921 to 1913)

Zao Wou-ki occupies a pivotal role in the artistic dialogue between East and West. A seminal figure in 20th century art, Zao studied with Lin Fengmian at the National Academy of Arts in Hangzhou in the 1940s before moving to Paris in 1947. Zao has since called France his home, and his influential career developed in that dynamic, cosmopolitan environment. Paris was still the capital of world culture [...] Click here to continue reading.

Lithography

Lithography

The word lithography comes from Greek lithos, meaning “stone” and grapho, meaning “writing.” Although “stone writing” is sometimes done today with a metal plate, traditionally the process gets its name from the use of limestone.

Lithography is made possible by one of the simplest scientific phenomena – the repelling relationship between water and oil. A hydrophobic (water-repelling) substance with a fat or oil base is used by the artist to draw the image [...] Click here to continue reading.

Fox, R. Atkinson – Canadian/American Artist & Illustrator

Robert Atkinson Fox (1860-1935)

Born Robert Atkinson Fox on December 11, 1860 in Toronto, Canada, Fox studied in Canada and Europe prior to arriving in America. He eventually went on to become one of the early 20th century’s most popular, most diverse, and most reproduced artists of his time with his work appearing as art prints, calendars, advertising pieces, ink blotters, candy and handkerchief boxes, jewelry boxes, magazine covers, children’s books, newspaper inserts, postcards, [...] Click here to continue reading.

Lenticular-Definition

Lenticular

Lenticular means, “1. shaped like a biconvex lens; 2. of or relating to a lens; 3. convex on both sides; lentil-shaped.”

In the world of collectibles, “lenticular” usually refers to a type of printing that creates a three-dimensional image through the use of a lenticular lens. The resulting images reveal changes in depth or motion as the viewing angle changes. (“Lenticular” doesn’t refer, despite the frequent use, necessarily to the image, but to [...] Click here to continue reading.

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