James, Jesse – American Outlaw

Jesse Woodson James, American Outlaw

Courtesy of James Julia Auction Company, presented in conjunction with the sale of Jesse James’ personal Colt revolver and holster rig (p4A item # D9737835)

Jesse Woodson James was born Sept. 5, 1847 in Clay County, Missouri. He had an older brother, Frank and a sister. His father, a minister, left soon after Jesse was born to go to California to “minister” to the 49er miners. He died in [...] Click here to continue reading.


Buffalo Bill Cody

William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody

The year 1883 neatly divides William Cody’s former life as a hunter, scout and guide from his later career as a showman. He was 37 in this year of transition.

The early life of William Frederick Cody (1846 to 1917) was colorful, adventurous and, thanks to Dime novels, exaggerated. He fought for the Union Army in the Civil War at 18. By 21, he earned his lifelong nickname [...] Click here to continue reading.


Spiller & Burr Revolvres

Spiller & Burr Civil War Confederate Revolvers

Courtesy of James Julia Auction Company, presented in conjunction with the sale of Spiller & Burr revolver, serial number 129 (p4A item # D9737705)

David J. Burr, of Richmond, Virginia, was an enterprising gentleman whose company had built a locomotive (1836) and a steam packet named, “The Gov. McDowell”, which navigated the James River and the Kanawha Canal (1842). In 1860, he is listed in the [...] Click here to continue reading.


Bakelite

Bakelite

Scandal & the Story of Bakelite Bakelite hit the market in 1907, heralding the arrival of the modern plastics industry. Bakelite was the first completely man made plastic, as until then, plastics such as celluloid, casein, and Gutta-Percha all had as a base a natural material. It was developed by Belgian-born chemist Dr. Leo Hendrick Baekeland who started his firm General Bakelite Company to produce the phenolic resin type plastic. Bakelite was inexpensive [...] Click here to continue reading.


Leech & Rigdon

Leech & Rigdon, Confederate Arms Manufacturers

Courtesy of James Julia Auction Company, presented in conjunction with the sale of Leech & Rigdon percussion revolver made in Greensboro, Georgia, SN 836 (p4A item # D9737741)

Thomas Leech first comes to notice in the Memphis City directory in the mid-1850s, as a cotton broker, and is also listed under “Guns, Pistols, Leech, Thomas, of Leech, T & Co.” Leech was probably an agent for a gun [...] Click here to continue reading.


Chief Sitting Bull – Sioux – Tatanka-Iyotanka

Sitting Bull, Sioux Chief (circa 1831 to 1890)

Sitting Bull, the man who would later become the Hunkpapa Sioux chief, was born in South Dakota, near the Grand River. His Lakota name was Tatanka-Iyotanka. In his thirties, he began to build his reputation as a warrior, leading war parties in Red Cloud’s War against a number of Dakota Territory forts. Although the U.S. negotiated with the Sioux in order to end the war and [...] Click here to continue reading.


Cartouche – Definition

Cartouche – Definition

The decorative arts world has many “squishy” and vague vocabulary words, but few are “squishier” and vaguer than cartouche. Originally, the term comes from Egyptology and is used to describe a oval enclosing hieroglyphics and having a horizontal line at one end. (The line denotes royalty.) The oval had significance not unlike that of a closed circle, in that it was believed that an oval around a person’s name provided protection [...] Click here to continue reading.


James, Jesse – Revolver Provenance

The Revolver and Holster Rig of Jesse Woodson James, American Outlaw

The James family history regarding this Colt Model 1860 revolver, belt & holster rig is mostly well-documented. When Jesse James was killed his wife Zerelda notified his cousins Rufus, Babe & Lamartine Hudspeth who were living near Lake City, Missouri, of Jesse’s death and asked them to come assist with the funeral. They immediately drove to St. Joseph, Missouri to help Zerelda and [...] Click here to continue reading.


Shakudo Definition

Shakudo – Definition

Shakudo is the Japanese term for a copper and gold alloy consisting of 2% to 7% gold and the remainder copper. This alloy can then be treated to achieve a blue-black color sometimes resembling lacquer. It was historically used to make and/or decorate Japanese swords. Contemporary jewelry makers have revived the use of shakudo for its unusual and beautiful coloring.

p4A editorial staff, March 2013


The Collection of Mr. and Mrs. James Grievo – Provenance-Pook May 2012

The Collection of Mr. and Mrs. James Grievo, Stockon, New Jersey

It all started around 1971. Just home from college and having a difficult time finding a job, I started going to house tag sales where I would find small interesting things to sell to antique dealers. It was something I really enjoyed doing, and 1 was amazed I was making real money for the first time. I soon realized that this was [...] Click here to continue reading.


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